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Friday, September 1st, 2017

 

Cholera outbreak hits IDP camp in northeastern Nigeria

Maiduguri, Nigeria: Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is scaling up its ongoing efforts to prevent further deaths and the spread of cholera in Maiduguri, Nigeria. MSF is working in coordination with the Ministry of Health (MoH) and other organisations that are responding to the outbreak in the city.

MSF has established a 40-bed cholera treatment centre in Dala, which has so far admitted 70 patients. Teams have set up an oral rehydration point in Muna camp, and 14 community health workers are helping to find new cases and trace community members who may have come into contact with affected people. The majority of cholera patients come from Muna Garage, a camp for people who have fled other parts of the state due to the ongoing conflict between the Nigerian armed forces and Boko Haram. Following heavy rains, the camp is partly flooded, which is an additional risk factor during a cholera outbreak. The flooding has made the already poor sanitary conditions at the camp even worse. A potential case has also now been reported from another part of the city.

“MSF has rapidly been responding to the cholera outbreak in Maiduguri. We set up a cholera treatment centre in Dala earlier this year in anticipation of a potential outbreak. Over the last week, we have witnessed a steady increase in the number of patients at our treatment centre and at the rehydration point in Muna camp,” said Anne-Cécile Niard, MSF Project Coordinator. “We are in the process of expanding the capacity of our treatment centre in Dala to 50 beds and are exploring the possibility of opening another treatment centre close to the most affected areas. We are worried that the number of beds that are currently planned will not be enough to cope with the peak of the outbreak.”

MSF is also setting up rehydration points in places where new cases are being reported and is sharing its medical expertise by training state health workers and those from the World Health Organization (WHO) in prevention and control methods.

“With early diagnosis and treatment, people have a very good chance of survival; already 37 patients have been discharged from our treatment centre in Dala,” said Anna Cillers, MSF Medical Coordinator. “However, to contain the spread of cholera in Maiduguri, the need for a coordinated response from the health authorities and other responders to this outbreak cannot be overstated.”

MSF is responding in coordination with the Ministry of Health and other organisations to make sure that affected households are sprayed with chlorine solution, and that soap and water purifying tablets are distributed in Muna Camp.

Since 2014, MSF has been providing nutrition, primary and secondary healthcare, medical aid in disease outbreaks, and monitoring access to food, clean water and shelter across 11 locations in Borno State, Nigeria.


Editorial Comment: Finally, Zifa remembers its football heroes!

Philip Chiyangwa

ZIFA’S announcement this week that they will, from this year, introduce awards of excellence to honour football heroes — the legends who graced our fields in the past and those who are starring right now — is a huge step in the right direction.

The inaugural awards are set to be held in Harare on November 11 and according to ZIFA president, Philip Chiyangwa, it will be a glitzy evening with the country’s football leaders promising to invite some African football legends to grace the occasion.

Five legendary Zimbabwean footballers are set to be honoured on the night, another five will be honoured next year with a similar number set to be honoured in 2019 when the awards will again be reviewed with a view to improve them.

That category of legends includes the likes of George Shaya, a five-time Soccer Star of the Year, Bruce Grobbelaar, the former Liverpool and Warriors goalkeeper, Tendai Chieza, Peter Nyama, Barry Daka, Nyaro Mumba to name, but just a few.

The importance of honouring these yesteryear stars can never be overemphasised given that we need to preserve the history of our national game so that it won’t be washed away by the passage of time.

It’s important that our future generations should always know where their game came from, pick some lessons from its history and then use them to try and improve the sport and legends like Shaya, whose magic used to mesmerise fans during his playing days, should never be forgotten.

That is why we fully support the introduction of these awards and also the announcement by ZIFA that they will this year unveil the Hall of Fame where they will induct those who deserve to be honoured for the part they have played in the history of our national game.

But, in honouring the yesteryear greats — be them the footballers, coaches or referees — ZIFA have also rightly not forgotten the stars of our game today, the footballers who are in the trenches flying our national flag in international competitions, the best of whom are set to be rewarded.

While we have traditionally honoured our outstanding players, coaches and referees on the domestic football scene since 1969, through the Soccer Stars of the Year awards, we have seemingly forgotten our stars who ply their trade in foreign countries and whom we largely depend upon to fly our flag in international tournaments like the AFCON and the World Cup qualifiers.

This has left our best footballers in a quandary where they are not honoured at home, despite their exploits for the national team and playing in bigger leagues, because they are ineligible for the domestic Soccer Stars of the Year awards and, usually, fall victims to hometown decisions, in the foreign leagues they play, when the time to honour the best comes around.

Khama Billiat was, by far, the best footballer playing his trade in Africa in the 2015/2016 season when he didn’t only lead his South African club, Mamelodi Sundowns, to the league championship, but he also inspired them to their maiden success story in the African Champions League.

However, when it came to the ceremony to honour the players who had excelled during that season, we saw the old Confederation of African Football leaders, known for their bleeps and blunders, somehow give the top award to Ugandan goalkeeper Denis Onyango when it was clear that Billiat had done more.

That the decision to snub Billiat came at a time when relations between our football leaders and the old CAF leadership, led by Issa Hayatou, were strained because of boardroom manoeuvres by the domestic football bosses to oust the Cameroonian from his post, fuelled speculation that the whole process was rigged to ensure a Zimbabwean wasn’t honoured.

Now, with the new awards, at least, someone like Billiat can find solace in getting honoured by his country and there is a lot of value in that.

In the past, a player like Knowledge Musona, who was outstanding in leading the Warriors to their first Nations Cup finals appearance in more than a decade, was somehow not honoured back home last year for his great efforts because we didn’t have the awards to ensure his grand efforts would be celebrated.

But all that is now set to change, thanks to the new initiative by ZIFA, which will see the best Zimbabwean footballers, who are plying their trade in foreign leagues, being honoured back home in the event for excelling during the season.

Zimbabwean football has to honour its heroes and we have Felix Tangawarima, who has been excelling as a FIFA referees’ instructor, but he doesn’t seem to get any recognition from home, and we have Solomon Mudenge, who has been climbing up the corporate ladder at FIFA, but never gets to be honoured back home.

Football is about celebrating its heroes and we are happy that, finally, some people at ZIFA have opened their eyes and seen value in rewarding the men and women who are the stars of our national game even when they are mostly plying their trade in foreign lands.


Tourisme durable: Un concept encore à développer

Bien que la Grande île soit une destination reconnue pour sa biodiversité riche  et authentique, y voyager sans nuire à l’environnement reste impossible.

Des efforts à déployer. À Madagascar, «le concept commence à prendre place. Néanmoins, des efforts demeurent à entreprendre pour appuyer son développement», à en croire Sylviane Rajerison, secrétaire exécutif au Comité Sectoriel Partenarial de Pilotage et de Coordination (CS2PC). A preuve, «la persistance des feux de brousse, l’exploitation abusive des ressources naturelles, comme les forêts de Mangrove qui, pourtant, figurent parmi les éléments majeurs du tourisme à Madagascar», a t-elle poursuivi. Cette situation résulterait d’un manque de sensibilisation, d’après les explications de cette dernière. «Une prise de conscience de la richesse du patrimoine et des bonnes pratiques touristiques est de mise, particulièrement au niveau de la population. Ensuite, il appartient à l’administration de règlementer et d’appuyer les opérateurs dans la promotion du tourisme durable», préconise t-elle. L’année 2017 a été déclarée par l’ONU comme celle du «Tourisme durable pour le développement».

La richesse et l’authenticité de la biodiversité de Madagascar font du pays une destination sans pareil. À cet effet, la majorité de nos clients étrangers viennent au pays pour découvrir sa biodiversité naturelle. On a des touristes qui sont des «birds watchers», nous a confié un responsable d’une agence de voyage de la capitale.

Enjeux

Même son de cloche de la part du Directeur régional du tourisme de la région Sava, Nadine Ibrahim Soavelo indique que «la grande majorité des touristes qui séjournent chez nous viennent pour des raisons bien précises, comme c’est le cas, notamment, des chercheurs qui séjournent en général à Marojejy et à Masoala pour y effectuer des travaux de recherches sur la biodiversité». À Madagascar, des réserves naturelles ont été classées patrimoine mondiale par l’Organisation des Nations unies pour l’éducation, la science et la culture (UNESCO).

«Nous ne sommes pas en mesure de concurrencer, par exemple, l’île Maurice en matière de qualité des infrastructures d’accueil, et ce, malgré les efforts entrepris en ce domaine. Par contre, la Grande île peut compter sur son capital naturel pour promouvoir la destination. C’est grâce à sa biodiversité importante que le pays pourra compéter avec les autres destinations touristiques», a souligné Sylviane Rajerison. Ainsi, des efforts sont à entreprendre pour conserver cet atout.

Source: L’express Mada


UN chief urges restraint by Myanmar forces to avoid ‘catastrophe’

UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres

United Nations, United States | AFP | UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres warned Friday of a looming humanitarian catastrophe in western Myanmar and urged the country’s security forces to show restraint after 400 people — most of them Rohingya Muslims — died in communal violence.

“The secretary-general is deeply concerned by the reports of excesses during the security operations conducted by Myanmar’s security forces in Rakhine State and urges restraint and calm to avoid a humanitarian catastrophe,” said a UN spokesman.

The violence has sent tens of thousands of Rohingya fleeing across the border into Bangladesh, while scores of desperate people have drowned trying to cross a border river in makeshift boats.

Reports of massacres and the systematic torching of villages by security forces — as well as by militants — have raised fears that the violence in Rakhine is spinning out of control.

Guterres recalled that it was the government’s responsibility to provide security and allow aid agencies to reach those in need.

On Tuesday, US Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley told Myanmar that its security forces must refrain from attacking civilians and aid workers in its response to attacks by Rohingya militants in Rakhine State.

The UN Security Council met behind closed doors on Wednesday to discuss the violence, but there was no formal statement on the crisis.

British Ambassador Matthew Rycroft, who requested the meeting, said council members called for de-escalation.


Kane’s double saves England blushes

Valletta, Malta | AFP | Harry Kane scored a brace to help Gareth Southgate’s lacklustre England to a 4-0 win over minnows Malta in their 2018 World Cup qualifier on Friday.

Kane opened the score early in the second-half but three goals inside the last 10 minutes put a brighter sheen on the result than the performance deserved.

Ryan Bertrand — with a long range effort barely acknowledged by a far from happy looking Southgate — Danny Welbeck and Kane at the death secured the points in Malta and keeps them top of Group F by two points from Slovakia.

However, the English — boasting players whose salaries and transfer fees dwarfed that of their opponents — will need to put up a far better display at home to the Slovakians on Monday.

Kane, though, said people should realise that Malta had set out to stifle and frustrate England — it is the first time in three meetings an England side has beaten the Maltese by more than a goal. “Whenever you come away for games like this it is never going to be easy,” he told ITV.

“We were trying to break them down, they had 10 men behind the ball. We knew if we just kept moving it wide we would find the space.

“The manager makes his choices (Southgate started with just him up front), he puts the team out he thinks we will win the game and we won 4-0 so we have done the right job tonight.”

England — winning for just the second time in their last six matches and giving Southgate his first away win since he took over — started brightly and could have been 2-0 up inside the first five minutes.

Raheem Sterling should have done better when found brilliantly by Kane just yards out from the goal but the Manchester City star dallied and allowed England-born goalkeeper Andrew Hogg to come out and gather the ball.

Hogg was very active early on and pulled off a fine reaction save from Kane in the fifth minute the Spurs striker meeting club team-mate Dele Alli’s pinpoint cross with his head.

However, from that point on till the second minute of time added on and Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain’s scuffed shot the Malta goalkeeper didn’t have another save to make.

The England players’ woeful performance saw them exit the pitch at half-time to a cacophony of boos and jeers from their fans.

– relief –

Southgate acted at half-time to remedy the lacklustre performance and took off Sterling sending on Manchester United youngster Marcus Rashford instead.

However, it was the hosts who came up with the first meaningful shot of the half Andre Schembri — the only player in the Malta squad to play in the top division of a European league for Apollon Limassol in Cyprus — fashioning out a half-volley that whistled past Hart’s far post.

Kane though at last broke the deadlock in the 53rd minute Alli doing superbly to draw two defenders to him then passing to his clubmate who made no mistake — earning a clap from Southgate more out of relief than joy.

Malta were far from disheartened, Sam Magri — a former England Youth international with the likes of Sterling and substitute Nathaniel Chalobah but now plying his trade with non league Ebbsfleet — fired in a decent long range effort that forced Hart to dive to cover it.

Kane showed he was just as dangerous from outside the box firing in a fierce effort on the hour mark that Hogg did well to save.

Bertrand and Welbeck added late goals before Kane sealed his double and his 10th in 20 internationals.

Rashford created it after refusing to follow Kyle Walker’s instruction and put the ball out because a Malta player was injured instead teeing up Kane.


Arnaud Carpooran: doyen de la faculté des sciences sociales et des humanités à l’UoM

La faculté des sciences sociales et des humanités fête ses 25 ans d’existence. Son doyen nous livre sa vision et ce qu’il compte faire pour que le «parent pauvre» de l’UoM soit plus respecté en tant que faculté.

Pour ses 25 ans d’existence, la faculté modifie son nom, passant de «social studies» à «social sciences». Est-ce pour faire plus sérieux ? 

Non, ce n’est pas ça. Il y a trois raisons qui motivent ce changement : c’est plus en phase avec la terminologie utilisée actuellement. Et puis, les sciences, c’est exactement ce que nous faisons à la faculté. La preuve, en français, c’est sciences sociales. C’est donner une dimension scientifique à des sujets que beaucoup de scientifiques ne considèrent pas comme tels, dont la littérature. 

Il y a une perception que les humanités ne relèvent pas des sciences. D’ailleurs, elles sont à part, en dehors des sciences sociales. La troisième raison, c’est qu’il existe, au sein de la faculté, un département de social studies qui comprend la sociologie, la psychologie, la communication, le travail social (social work). À côté de cela, il y a le département d’économie, qui n’est pas le même que celui des social studies. Ce qui veut dire que l’économie ne se retrouvait pas dans l’appellation de la faculté.

Au-delà de l’opération cosmétique, ce changement de nom correspond-il à une volonté de renouvellement ? 

À mon arrivée comme doyen de la faculté, lors de mon premier discours officiel, j’ai dit qu’il fallait un retour à l’essentiel. Redécouvrir le sens de chacun des mots qui composent le nom de la faculté des sciences sociales et des humanités. J’ai l’impression que beaucoup de personnes ne comprennent pas ce nom. Dans le cas des humanités, les dérivés sont les valeurs humaines, les droits humains, la définition de l’homme.

Ceux qui ne comprennent pas le sens des humanités sont-ils sur le campus de Réduit ? 

Tout à fait : étudiants et universitaires. Si quelqu’un visite le site Web de la faculté, à la rubrique qui détaille sa mission et sa vision, le mot «humanités» n’apparaît pas. Nous invitons toutes les parties concernées à replacer l’humain au centre des préoccupations académiques, de la recherche, dans un contexte de perte des valeurs humaines.

C’est une faculté mal aimée ? 

Oui. Il y a la perception que c’est le parent pauvre de l’université. Jusqu’à tout récemment, dans l’administration de l’université, il y avait des personnes issues des sciences ou de l’ingénierie, avec une façon de regarder les choses formatée par les sciences pures. 

En tant qu’universitaire, il fallait travailler beaucoup plus pour être pris au sérieux. Par exemple, quand un sociologue intervenait sur une radio, on disait que cela n’était pas académique, que c’était une opinion. Or, le sociologue s’exprime en tant que professionnel. C’est pour cela que pour évaluer les universitaires, il faut prendre en compte le facteur humain dans notre faculté.

Concrètement, comment replacer l’humain dans un programme académique ? 

Dans toutes nos discussions, nous avons dit aux universitaires de s’assurer que le facteur humain est pris en compte, même quand on fait de l’économie. Dans le cas des social studies, c’est un domaine qui est confronté à toutes les questions sociétales, les universitaires ne peuvent se contenter d’écrire des papiers sur le sujet, sans se sentir concernés par ces questions. Et non pas proposer des solutions, mais poser les bonnes questions.

Vous demandez à toute la faculté de s’engager dans des actions ? 

L’engagement communautaire doit être dans le mandat de la faculté. Que ce soit en économie, en histoire, en sciences politiques, etc. Nous sommes les plus concernés par ce qui se déroule autour de nous. Nous ne pouvons pas nous enfermer dans une tour d’ivoire. Donner des cours, écrire des papiers qui seront publiés dans des revues internationales, gagn promosion, monté. C’est aberrant qu’un universitaire ne se sente pas concerné par ce qui se passe autour de lui, sur le plan social, humain etc…

L’une des critiques qui reviennent le plus souvent, c’est que les universitaires sont absents des débats publics. 

Je suis tout à fait d’accord avec ce point de vue. Mais tout le monde n’est pas comme cela. Certes, on entend Christina Chan-Meetoo, Roukaya Kasenally, mais elles font figure d’exception. Il y a Jocelyn Chan Low, Sheila Bunwaree…

Mais ils ne sont plus à la faculté. Le jour du Budget, on ne se souvient pas de l’analyse d’un universitaire du département d’économie. 

C’est ce que j’ai dit lors des rencontres avec les chargés de cours. Ce n’est pas normal de ne pas prendre la parole quand il y a une actualité qui concerne directement le département.

Comment a été accueillie, au sein de la faculté, cette invitation à faire entendre sa voix ? 

Ils ont tous été contents. Le thème de la semaine de la recherche, qui aura lieu dans le courant de septembre, sera axé dessus. Nous invitions l’ensemble de la faculté à s’impliquer davantage au sein de la communauté.

Cette directive est-elle verbale ou formelle ? 

C’est formalisé dans le cadre des activités pour les 25 ans de la faculté. Par exemple, j’ai rencontré Irène Alessandri de l’APEIM pour mettre en place un audit autour des nombreuses questions qu’elle a soulevées sur l’enseignement spécialisé (NdlR, Irène Alessandri s’est retirée fin juillet). 

Revenons au département d’histoire. Vous avez mentionné Jocelyn Chan Low qui a pris sa retraite de la faculté. Vijaya Teelock n’est pas loin de lui emboîter le pas. Qu’en est-il de la relève ? 

Je suis assez inquiet que cette génération de colosses – avec Sada Reddi – soit sur le départ. Il faudra maintenant fabriquer une nouvelle génération d’historiens, pour qu’ils marchent dans les pas de leurs aînés. Cela fait partie des projets de l’université : que tous les enseignants aient un doctorat dans les quatre à cinq ans à venir. Il y a un rajeunissement du personnel. Aujourd’hui, l’un des plus anciens de la faculté, c’est moi. Mais je n’ai pas l’impression d’être si vieux.


Early elections? Why not!

TOUR DE FORCE . . . Part of the zanu-pf faithful at an open ground behind Mkoba Teachers’ College in Gweru yesterday, for the 7th leg of President Mugabe’s interactive meetings with youths

Radar
The story is getting all too familiar. The Zanu-PF juggernaut is rolling. Zanu-PF is on a rampage.

Zanu-PF is on a mission.

Yesterday it was Gweru, the Midlands capital — at the very heart of the country.

The party showed its massive mobilising prowess once again, with all its meanness and ruthless efficiency.

Let’s give the generous estimate that 120 000 people turned up for the mega rally under the motif of the Presidential Youth Interface Rallies.

This was the seventh leg.

We all know what this means.

We have been superlative in our description of how Zanu-PF is good at mobilising its supporters for a cause — perhaps just about any cause in the name of the party.

That is what matters at the end of the day.

The numbers of the party faithful.

The voting faithful.

Never mind about the sour grapes from opponents about the calibre of supporters — whether they are bussed in, as is the common lame excuse; whether they come from the rural areas or they are uneducated.

Politics is a numbers game; so is democracy.

With Zanu-PF tour de force we know what this means: let’s say pretty much everyone else does.

There is today a near universal agreement that Zanu-PF is bound to win elections set for next year.

Interestingly, even the stolid opponents of Zanu-PF are resigned to this fact and are mapping out how to work with the ever ruling party post 2018.

Just so the reader knows, there is a lot of consultation from people outside who are running permutations as to how the next Government will work and relate.

But the future is decidedly Zanu-PF.

The opposition has been relegated to circumstance — circumstantial of, and to, a Zanu-PF hegemony.

At least for another five years.

Till 2023.

The reader may have come across such scenarios as run by Alex Magaisa which at best sees the opposition fighting — or having to fight to avoid Zanu-PF claiming two-thirds majority in Parliament.

That is the best the opposition could achieve.

Magaisa was speaking in the context of the recent passage of Constitutional Amendment Number 1.

He said: “As I have pointed out, two thirds majority is the minimum threshold required to amend the Constitution and having two thirds majority in the hands of a ruling party is a danger to the Constitution. Given how ZANU-PF has behaved in regards to Amendment No. 1, the nation can only fear more such changes should it win by two thirds majority next year. They were probably too embarrassed to use their majority so soon after the new Constitution was adopted in 2013, but they will probably go into overdrive should they retain two thirds majority in 2018. This means as a matter of strategy, in the absence of outright victory in 2018, the opposition must at the very least target preventing a two thirds majority for ZANU PF.”

The idea of the opposition scrapping just enough to stop a whitewash is currently in vogue.

And it is the most realistic expectation, bar any miracles.

Miracles are hard to come by these days.

Bloody Bulawayo.

Let’s talk about the opposition.

The opposition is rallying around the idea of a coalition under the banner of MDC-Alliance. That is about the biggest outfit, anyway.

This one is led by Morgan Tsvangirai and is proving to be a such a hard sell.

Other parties such as Joice Mujuru’s NPP, Dumiso Dabengwa’s Zapu and so forth have rejected the idea.

At least on some technicalities.

But much more interesting is the fact that within the MDC-T itself there are others who are against the very spirit of coalition.

Thokhozani Khupe and her Matabeleland cohorts are not keen on the coalition — and have paid a heavy price for it with some physical beatings being meted on them just recently, followed up by the suspension and other political pogroms that are likely to be undergoing.

Already Abednico Bhebhe has been suspended.

He is the national organising secretary.

What is interesting is that today, September 2, Morgan Tsvangirai is taking to Bulawayo to launch the MDC-Alliance.

It is a hostile move.

We are fearing for the worst: blood on the floor.

Morgan Tsvangirai is known to deploy thugs to “discipline” dissenting members of his party.

We are likely to see violence in Bulawayo: we do not expect Khupe to take it lying down.

The hostile takeover will be resisted, setting the stage for what could be yet another split — again.

Let’s wait and see.

And pray.

Early elections

The Daily News this week had an interesting story in which it claimed that the ruling party, Zanu-PF was planning to hold elections earlier than anticipated in what the paper mainly thinks will be a ploy to catch the opposition flat-footed.

Which it is now — at sixes and sevens.

The story is interesting in one big way: it sets the agenda for us to begin to think (of) elections and elections next year with the newspaper going to admirable length to show us the political and legal imperatives for the move.

Zanu-PF’s secretary for Administration Ignatius Chombo is quoted as saying: “ . . . there is no doubt that the elections are going to take place in the first half of next year. Time is, therefore, of essence if we are going to put in place mechanisms that will help us win the election.”

He adds bullishly: “And for us as Zanu PF, there is no other option, but to win thiselection by a margin that leaves no doubt that we are the dominantpolitical party in this country.”

A couple of ways have been suggested as means to force an early election, chief of which would be the dissolution of Parliament.

In July this year, when the question of early elections arose, Doug Coltart wrote in the Newsday question whether the ruling party could call for early elections.

Again, Chombo had just indicated that the ruling party was keen on an early poll.

“The short answer is, yes,” he explained.

“Zanu-PF controls more than two-thirds of both houses of Parliament and so, if all of their parliamentarians act together, they do have the ability to dissolve Parliament and call early elections . . . Normal votes in Parliament only require a simple majority (over 50 percent) of the Members of Parliament (MPs) present at the time of the vote.

“Since this resolution requires 66,6 percent of all MPs (whether or not everyone is present), it is a much more onerous hurdle, not least because many MPs frequently don’t turn up for work!”

Coltart noted that Zanu-PF MPs “typically vote as a block and are very subservient to the executive and so they might still do as they are told even if it’s against their personal interests.”

That, ladies and gentlemen, means that elections are closer than we may have budgeted for.

Good thing is that they come with all the interest and intrigues that we would love to see — and most happily, resolve some deeper leadership questions.

So, may the best team win!

Mad at Mudede

The Registrar-General Tobaiwa Mudede this week announced that it is starting a three-month national mobile registration exercise for national identity cards, birth and death certificates in preparation for voter-registration.

He advised aspiring voters to obtain machine readable plastic national identity cards which will be used for biometric voter registration.

He explained: “It is our stand that everyone should be registered and it will not be possible for anybody to go to elections next year without the documents and argue that she or he was never allowed to register.

“You will never be allowed to vote without these documents. I am sure the Zimbabwe Electoral Commission (Zec) will be coming behind us so that there will be verification at the same time.”

Expectedly, the news was latched onto by our opposition who claimed that it was part of vote rigging — which is a rather familiar tale.

As the fact that Mudede himself is not such a liked figure in the opposition which is forever on the lookout for excuses.

According to one news story, Transform Zimbabwe leader Jacob Ngaruvhume (Tsvangirai’s ally in the Alliance), said “this is broad daylight rigging.”

“This is unacceptable, voter registration must be done by ZEC not the RG. They want to rerun to their old system which they have used to rig previous elections.”

Ngarivhume added: “Zimbabweans will not accept that, they must be ready for backlash. We will resist this with contempt it deserves.”

Well, that’s some bravado there from Mr Ngarivhume, no doubt took keen to impress his opposition alliance colleagues!

But it is also folly writ large.

Just how some people think that the office of RG can be wished away in such an exercise as central to its mandate as issuing identity registration beats the mind.

While it is true that ZEC ought to play a key role in registering voters and administering elections, there is not way it cannot do without the very department that has the national database!

It is something that the likes of Ngarivhume may need to get it in their skulls.

It is not a matter of liking the person of Mudede.

It is bureaucracy.


WRAPUP 1-Soccer-Moses shines as Nigeria move closer to World Cup

CAPE TOWN, Sept 1 (Reuters) – Victor Moses inspired Nigeria to take a step closer to World Cup qualification on Friday but Cameroon, Ghana and South Africa suffered serious blows to their chances of reaching next year’s finals in Russia.

Moses scored once and helped set up two others as Nigeria hammered African champions Cameroon 4-0 in Uyo to keep up their 100 percent record in Group B.

The Super Eagles advanced to nine points, seven ahead of Cameroon, who host Nigeria in a return game on Monday but whose hopes of an African record-extending eighth World Cup finals appearance is now in tatters.

Chelsea’s Moses was key to the dominance of Nigeria, who were 2-0 up at halftime through Odion Ighalo and John Obi Mikel and added two more through Moses and Kelechi Iheanacho in the second half.

Tunisia are the only other side with a 100 percent record in the African qualifiers as they edged the Democratic Republic of Congo 2-1 in Tunis in their top-of-the-table clash in Group A with Ghilane Chalali’s winner coming just after halftime.

But the Congolese can go back level with Tunisia if they win the next clash between the two in Kinshasa on Tuesday.

Dutch-born midfielder Hakim Ziyech marked his return to the Moroccan side with two goals as they went to the top of Group C with a 6-0 home win over Mali in Rabat.

Ghana, who have been to the last three World Cups, are way off the pace in Group E after being held at home by Congo.

They sit five points behind leaders Uganda after Thomas Partey equalised for them five minutes from time in Kumasi. Congo had led from the 18th minute after a defensive error was exploited by Thievy Bifouma and picked up their first point of the campaign.

South Africa, hoping to open up a lead in Group D, scored early but conceded twice in five minutes to go down away 2-1 to the tiny Cape Verde Islands in a massive blow to their hopes.

Nuno Rocha scored both for Cape Verde, the second from a unnecessary penalty given away by South African midfielder Dean Furman.

Qualifiers in Africa continue on Saturday, Monday and Tuesday when four of the six rounds of group matches will have been completed. Only the winners of the five groups advance to the finals in Russia. (Editing by Ed Osmond)


WRAPUP 1-Soccer-Moses shines as Nigeria move closer to World Cup

CAPE TOWN, Sept 1 (Reuters) – Victor Moses inspired Nigeria to take a step closer to World Cup qualification on Friday but Cameroon, Ghana and South Africa suffered serious blows to their chances of reaching next year’s finals in Russia.

Moses scored once and helped set up two others as Nigeria hammered African champions Cameroon 4-0 in Uyo to keep up their 100 percent record in Group B.

The Super Eagles advanced to nine points, seven ahead of Cameroon, who host Nigeria in a return game on Monday but whose hopes of an African record-extending eighth World Cup finals appearance is now in tatters.

Chelsea’s Moses was key to the dominance of Nigeria, who were 2-0 up at halftime through Odion Ighalo and John Obi Mikel and added two more through Moses and Kelechi Iheanacho in the second half.

Tunisia are the only other side with a 100 percent record in the African qualifiers as they edged the Democratic Republic of Congo 2-1 in Tunis in their top-of-the-table clash in Group A with Ghilane Chalali’s winner coming just after halftime.

But the Congolese can go back level with Tunisia if they win the next clash between the two in Kinshasa on Tuesday.

Dutch-born midfielder Hakim Ziyech marked his return to the Moroccan side with two goals as they went to the top of Group C with a 6-0 home win over Mali in Rabat.

Ghana, who have been to the last three World Cups, are way off the pace in Group E after being held at home by Congo.

They sit five points behind leaders Uganda after Thomas Partey equalised for them five minutes from time in Kumasi. Congo had led from the 18th minute after a defensive error was exploited by Thievy Bifouma and picked up their first point of the campaign.

South Africa, hoping to open up a lead in Group D, scored early but conceded twice in five minutes to go down away 2-1 to the tiny Cape Verde Islands in a massive blow to their hopes.

Nuno Rocha scored both for Cape Verde, the second from a unnecessary penalty given away by South African midfielder Dean Furman.

Qualifiers in Africa continue on Saturday, Monday and Tuesday when four of the six rounds of group matches will have been completed. Only the winners of the five groups advance to the finals in Russia. (Editing by Ed Osmond)


WRAPUP 1-Soccer-Moses shines as Nigeria move closer to World Cup

CAPE TOWN, Sept 1 (Reuters) – Victor Moses inspired Nigeria to take a step closer to World Cup qualification on Friday but Cameroon, Ghana and South Africa suffered serious blows to their chances of reaching next year’s finals in Russia.

Moses scored once and helped set up two others as Nigeria hammered African champions Cameroon 4-0 in Uyo to keep up their 100 percent record in Group B.

The Super Eagles advanced to nine points, seven ahead of Cameroon, who host Nigeria in a return game on Monday but whose hopes of an African record-extending eighth World Cup finals appearance is now in tatters.

Chelsea’s Moses was key to the dominance of Nigeria, who were 2-0 up at halftime through Odion Ighalo and John Obi Mikel and added two more through Moses and Kelechi Iheanacho in the second half.

Tunisia are the only other side with a 100 percent record in the African qualifiers as they edged the Democratic Republic of Congo 2-1 in Tunis in their top-of-the-table clash in Group A with Ghilane Chalali’s winner coming just after halftime.

But the Congolese can go back level with Tunisia if they win the next clash between the two in Kinshasa on Tuesday.

Dutch-born midfielder Hakim Ziyech marked his return to the Moroccan side with two goals as they went to the top of Group C with a 6-0 home win over Mali in Rabat.

Ghana, who have been to the last three World Cups, are way off the pace in Group E after being held at home by Congo.

They sit five points behind leaders Uganda after Thomas Partey equalised for them five minutes from time in Kumasi. Congo had led from the 18th minute after a defensive error was exploited by Thievy Bifouma and picked up their first point of the campaign.

South Africa, hoping to open up a lead in Group D, scored early but conceded twice in five minutes to go down away 2-1 to the tiny Cape Verde Islands in a massive blow to their hopes.

Nuno Rocha scored both for Cape Verde, the second from a unnecessary penalty given away by South African midfielder Dean Furman.

Qualifiers in Africa continue on Saturday, Monday and Tuesday when four of the six rounds of group matches will have been completed. Only the winners of the five groups advance to the finals in Russia. (Editing by Ed Osmond)